The Education Arcade – Games, Simulations and Tools for Playful, Powerful Learning

This website offers games, simulations and programming tools, curriculum, and online professional development courses in educational technology that demonstrate how advanced math, science, and humanities content can be effectively combined with state-of-the-art game play for deeper student understanding and engagement. Produced by researchers at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and partners, game highlights include The Radix Endeavor (for middle and high school levels), an immersive virtual learning experience in which students conduct experiments to learn how systems in a virtual Earth-like world work and then collaborate to solve problems using math and scientific reasoning; and Ubiquitous Bio (for high school students), a series of four biology-themed games for mobile devices in which students explore topics in genetics, protein synthesis, evolution, and food webs. Teachers can access data generated by the games and use the data to inform future lesson plans.

Full Link: https://education.mit.edu/

eSkeletons Project

Examine the bony anatomy of humans, baboons, and gorillas, and learn about the important morphological and muscular features of the skeleton. Created by the Department of Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin, the eSkeletons project and website offer several K–12 teaching resources on skeletal anatomy, including life-sized printouts of adult and juvenile human skeletons, word searches, crossword puzzles, matching games, and more. The resources are versioned for elementary, middle, and high school levels, and there is also a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section, which addresses questions about bone biology and the human skeleton, such as What materials make up bone?, What is the function of bone?, How do bones grow?, and What are the smallest bones in the human body?

Full Link: http://www.eskeletons.org/

What Every Teacher Needs to Know – The Chemistry of Coffee

Grab a cup of joe—and get high school students’ excited about chemistry. This 10-lesson series created by high school educator Nate Talafuse, presents coffee from a chemical perspective. The lessons explore the chemistry of solutions, acids/bases and pH, the chemical compounds in coffee beans, the roasting process, and the art of coffee tasting, while also providing opportunities for students to use a temperature probe and timer (to observe how heat causes chemical reactions to occur, turning a “green” bean to dark) and a colorimeter (to determine the concentration of a solution—in this case, the pH of coffee—by analyzing its color intensity).

Full Link: https://sites.google.com/a/billingsschools.org/talafuse/chemistry-of-coffee

The Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry Project

The Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project (grades 3–12) presents STEM activities that use integrated technologies, such as modeling, computational thinking, and real-time data acquisition. Available for elementary, middle level, and high school levels, the activities combine hands-on inquiry with integrated, technology-based learning and address numerous topics in engineering, life science, physical science, Earth science, environmental science, biology, chemistry, and physics. For example, in Wind Generator (Elementary 3–4 Engineering), students design and build paper turbine blade models and use a voltage sensor to collect data about how much energy each design generates. In Reaction Time (Middle School Life Science), students use a computer interactive to record data on how quickly they move a finger in response to three different types of signals: sight, sound, and touch. Probability Clouds (High School Chemistry) explores the structure and properties of atoms through several model-building computer interactives.

Full Link: https://itsi.portal.concord.org/